Eucalyptus species ‘Cattai’

Eucalyptus species ‘Cattai’

By Jacqueline Britton
Cattai Aware Project Officer (Rural)

Australia has over 700 species of eucalypts but did you know we have our very own species of eucalypt found only in the Cattai catchment, called Eucalyptus species Cattai. The species is very rare and has been listed under New South Wales and Commonwealth environmental legislation as Critically Endangered as it is facing an extremely high risk of extinction.

It has been recorded in Glenorie, Annangrove, Kenthurst, Glenhaven and Kellyville.

It is a small, mallee-form tree that can grow up to 4.5 m with thick, furrowed and fibrous bark. Adult leaves are dark green and glossy, and paler on the underside. It can grow individually or in small clustered groups usually around sandstone ridgetops in scrub, heath or low woodland.

Some of its threats are clearing, urban development and altered fire-regimes. Fire is essential for seed germination.

I recently visited for the first time, the Eucalyptus species Cattai population in Heath Road, North Kellyville. At this location there are a number of trees growing along the ridgetop in a pocket of bushland close to urban development.

One of CHEN’s goals is to increase awareness in the local community of this rare and unique species and to aid its protection.

Information Sources:

NSW Office of Environment & Heritage (OEH) (2019).  Eucalyptus sp. Cattai – profile.  Available at:  https://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/threatenedSpeciesApp/profile.aspx?id=10317

Teresa James (2018) Rare and threatened flora of the Hills Shire Council

Platypus Story

Platypus Story

Authored by Cross et al, Changeology Workshop, October 2017

Based on a true story

Two of our newly arrived residents from overseas were clearing privet on their property.  This is their story.

One crisp spring morning we finally came to the bank of the creek.  In wonder we gazed at the water running between the rocks and the cool dark pools.  Suddenly we saw a flash of fur and a rounded beak.  We had never encountered such a strange looking animal before and called our neighbour. 

It was a platypus! 


Media Release from the ABC:
We still do have platypus in some of our creeks – what can we do to ensure they survive and thrive?

Scientists have joined forces with tech giant Google to build an app that allows Australians to gather information about one of our most unique and elusive animals, the platypus.

Key points:

  • Scientists say urban sprawl and climate change are big threats to the platypus
  • The app lets people send photos and observations to an online database
  • The data will be used in the first national survey of Australia’s platypus population

It is not clear how many platypuses are living in the wild, but conservationists say the star of the 20-cent coin is facing an uncertain future due to urban sprawl and river pollution.

Read more