Platypus Landcare – Repairing Riparian in the Cattai Creek Corridor

CHEN has started a new project to assist in platypus conservation efforts after finding platypus eDNA in the Cattai and Little Cattai Creek Catchment. This project will assist in the repair of the riparian zones in Cattai creek by removing the environmental weeds along the banks and planting the indigenous plants of this vegetative community, the Sydney Shale Transition Forest, an endangered ecological community.

Eroding bank. Image by Danielle Packer 2021.
Platypus Burrow within the Cattai Creek Catchment. Image by Dr. Michelle Ryan 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The creek banks have become eroded due to changes in the flow regime due to stormwater release via conventional drains. They also become eroded due to weeds replacing native plants which keep the banks together with their deep roots. Platypus rely on these sturdy banks to use for their burrows which they use as shelter, protection, and to nest their young.

At the moment we have five landholders that have properties along Cattai and Blue Gum Creek and are meeting up monthly at each site to repair these riparian zones and assist in the natural regeneration of the bush.

The more volunteers we have to assist in this project the larger the area of the creek line we can cover and therefore repair more platypus habitat. If you would like to become involved, either continuously, or just for one day, we would love the help! Please email danielle@chen.org.au if you would like to be added to our mailing list. We will soon have a Facebook Group which you can be added to, to keep up to date with our events and come along to the ones you want.

We had our first Platypus Landcare day on the 6th of June 2021 in Annangrove along Cattai Creek. Conservation Volunteers Australia (CVA) assisted us in our mission as they were looking for a site to help in flood recovery efforts. Instead of five landholders, we had about 20 people show up! This big turnout really helped us make a big difference for our first day and inspired us to see the impact we can have. Dr. Michelle Ryan, Lecturer at Western Sydney University (WSU) came along to our first day to speak with all the volunteers about the platypus and how the work we are doing is helping restore platypus habitat.

You can register for our second event by registering with CVA here!

CVA Volunteers Repairing Riparian Zones. Image by Danielle 2021.
Dr Michelle Ryan talking to the volunteers about the platypuss
Dr. Michelle Ryan talking to the volunteers about the platypus. Image by Danielle 2021.

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