65% of Weeds That End Up In Bushland Come From Urban Gardens…

65% of Weeds That End Up In Bushland Come From Urban Gardens…

After doing some bush regeneration work, our team noticed that a few houses that back up onto bushland had been responsible for dumping their green waste, including grass clippings over the fence. My supervisor reminded me that this is a problem for them and the health of the bushland or reserve because that is how weeds spread here in the first place.

What is a Weed?

Weeds are classified as any plant that has situated itself somewhere it is not wanted. In this blogs context, they are plants that are occur in an environment in which they are not native to.

Weeds are a big problem here in NSW as they compete with native flora for natural resources such as water, light, nutrients and space. They can also harbor diseases and pests.

This impacts Australia’s native wildlife as they depend upon native tree’s and plants for shelter, food and nesting. More concerning is that weeds often grow faster then their native competitors and so they can out-compete them to become dominant in natural areas. The natural pests that would usually control or reduce their growth are lacking as the plants have been introduced somewhere else.

65% of weeds invading reserves or bush land areas have come from urban gardens

Garden Escapees & Other Weeds of Bush land & Reserves

It is hard to control weeds once they have established themselves and end up being very economically and environmentally costly.

There are over 1,350 invasive species that have naturalized themselves here in NSW and 300 of them are having significant environmental impacts to NSW ‘s biodiversity and primary production.

Green Waste Dumping

When you dump your waste into reserves or nearby bushland, you are actually introducing those plant species into that reserve and they can spread, depending on the species, relatively fast.

Source: Weed Force

Bridal creeper, Asparagus Asparagoides is an example of a weed that was introduced as a garden plant but spread significantly into bushland and has now widely established itself in Southern Australia. In fact, it has been labelled as a weed of National Significance in Australia due to its invasiveness, potential of spread and economic and environmental costs.

Bridal creeper is damaging to native plants because it grows as a thick mat of underground tubers over the bushland floor and actually slows down the root growth of other native plants and quite often prevents that species from seed establishment.

Some native plants are being so overthrown by bridal creeper that they are now threatened to near extinction, one example is the Rice Flower, Pimelea spicata.

Weedy Garden Plants

Some plant species are called ‘weedy garden plants’ because they can spread into bushland even if they remain in your garden bed. They do this by their ability to spread by vegetative means, such as through their bulbs, root parts, corms, tubers or stem fragments. They can also be transferred outside their garden bed by the wind, water and from animals such as birds that eat and defecate the fruit to another area.

What Can We Do?

Source: Good Living

We definitely have the capacity to help reduce the spread of weeds into our beautiful bushland and nature reserves by making small but meaningful actions such as:

  • Plant Natives – This helps create a corridor for native wildlife in urban areas, providing them with a path for shelter, food and nesting. It also replaces purchasing exotic plants which have the potential to spread to nearby bushland.
  • Dispose your green waste responsibly – Avoid dumping your green waste into reserves or bushland and instead use your green waste bin. Another alternative is to use a compost bin to turn your green waste into nutrient rich soil.
  • Regularly prune your garden plants after flowering to prevent seed set and dispersal
  • Cover Green Waste if you are transporting your garden clippings in a trailer – This prevents seeds and weeds blowing off and invading roadside and bushland areas
  • Use your General Waste bin to put your plant tubers, bulbs and seed heads into rather then your green waste bin to avoid seed dispersal

Sources:

2012 ‘Garden Escapes & Other Weeds in Bushland and Reserves’, Sydney Weeds Committees, Available at: https://www.hawkesbury.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0007/62557/SWC_GardenBooklet_WEB_VERSION1.pdf

‘Weed Management Guide – Bridal Creeper (Asparagus Asparagoides)’, Weeds of National Significance – National Heritage Trust, Available at: https://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/invasive/weeds/publications/guidelines/wons/pubs/a-asparagoides.pdf

Is This The Most Eco-Friendy Cleaning Product?!

Is This The Most Eco-Friendy Cleaning Product?!

Most commercial dish washing liquids, laundry powders and soaps are actually very harmful to our local environment. The surfactants, phosphorus levels, dyes, bleaching agents, scourers, polishes, softners, and scents that are contained in these products get carried into our sewage system and into our local waterways, contaminating them.

There are some brands out there however, that consider the environment when creating their product and therefore contain ingredients that are environmentally friendly. Some brands include Ecologic, Koala Eco or Eco-Store.

The Most Environmentally Friendly Cleaning ‘Product’

After searching for some cheap, effective and eco-friendly products online, I came across something that blew my mind away. It was eco-friendly in every way, from its packaging material and ingredient list to its disposal process, it leaves no harmful trace to this world but only benefits it and us!

That Red House – Soapberries

It is a thing called Soapberries. Soap berries (also referred to as soap nuts, although not actually a nut) are the fruit of the Sapindus Mukorossi tree. This tree grows primarily in the Himalayas as well as several other regions of the world. The fruit is harvested under ethical conditions by small communities. By purchasing these berries, you are supporting the ‘Grow Nepal’ initiative which helps the Nepal people create an income and protecting these tree’s helps reduce deforestation in the Himalayas.

How do they work?

The berries contain a very high level of a particular ingredient called ‘saponin’ that acts as a cleaning agent, it has been called ‘Nature’s soap’. Soapberries work to reduce the surface tension in water to remove dirt and clean almost anything around the home.The berries contain nothing more then themselves, which means there are no chemicals, no packaging, they are grey water safe and can be composted at the end of their use. They come with a small cotton bag that is reused and nothing more!

Image from https://soapnuts.co.nz/natural-and-eco-friendly-detergent/soapnuts/what-are-soapnuts

LAUNDRY DETERGENT

Using Soapberries as a laundry detergent is the easiest way to use them as you simply put five soap berry shells in the small cotton bag provided, add a few drops of essential oils for desired smell (optional), throw into the washing machine with your clothes, and remove when finished. Those 5 shells can actually be used for 4-5 washes as well. They will slowly become thin and brittle, to which you can throw out, or better yet, add them to your compost bin to break down naturally.

MULTI-PURPOSE SPRAY

Soap berries can also be used as a multi-purpose spray. To do this, boil the berries for 15 minutes, drain the remaining liquid with a nut milk bag, pop it into a reusable spray bottle and your done!

ECONOMICAL

Eco-friendly cleaning products can be more expensive then your usual go-to cleaning product which is a shame as it is an important factor consumers consider when choosing cleaning products. That is why I love Soap berries all the more! They are very economical, costing only 10 cents per wash.

Get Yours Here from Biome or That Red House!

Thank you!

Thank you for taking the time to read this blog and educate yourself on being more environmentally conscious in your home. Let me know what you think of these berries in the comment section below. I would love to know if you have used them and how they went!

Sources:

https://www.organicconsumers.org/news/how-toxic-are-your-household-cleaning-supplies

https://www.thatredhouse.com.au/

https://www.biome.com.au/soap-nuts/15377-soapberry-shells-250g-799439052888.html

Cut One Third of Your Waste by Doing this ONE Thing…

Cut One Third of Your Waste by Doing this ONE Thing…

There is a lot of talk nowadays about how we can better manage our waste more responsibly whether that is concerning single-use plastics, recycling or composting our waste.

It is talked about more undoubtedly due to the severe impact waste ending up in landfill has on our environment, specifically the significant amount of green house gas emissions landfill sites produce.

Not only that, but the population in Sydney, Australia and the rest of the world is rapidly increasing, with a global population estimate of 9 billion by 2050. When the population increases, so does our waste.

Finding where we can individually make small but meaningful changes in our day-to-day lives can make a big difference, especially if we help and educate one another.

In the Hills District, there is concern about the amount of waste we are contributing to landfill. The Resilient Sydney Report by The Hills Shire Council using data collected from 2016/17 found that The Hills Shire were contributing more residual and green waste per capital then the NSW average. To be more specific, residents within the Hills District generate 17% more residual waste per capital and 28% more green waste.

Weekly Household Waste Production

How Can We Reduce Our Waste Going to Landfill?

Read more

The WINNER of the Cattai Challenge is…..Leanne Tran!

The WINNER of the Cattai Challenge is…

The WINNER of the Cattai Challenge is…..Leanne Tran!!Her Eco-tip was Worm Farming! This enabled her to divert her household food waste from landfill and instead use it for her worms 🐛😁We are very excited to give away our Eco- Bundle to Leanne and we thank her for sharing with us her Eco-tip 💚

Posted by Cattai Hills Environment Network CHEN on Wednesday, 22 April 2020

Her Eco-tip was Worm Farming! This enabled her to divert her household food waste from landfill and instead use it for her worms.

We are very excited to give away our Eco- Bundle to Leanne and we thank her for sharing with us her Eco-tip.

Read more!

Day 14 of the 14 Day Cattai Challenge – Happy Earth Day

Happy Earth Day Everyone!

Today’s last and final Eco-tip is concerning the plastic endemic again!

When out food shopping, instead of using plastic bags to hold your fruit and vegetables, bring with you some Reusable Produce Bags!

The ones I have, from EVERECO are actually made from Recycled plastic water bottles! So that is another Eco bonus

These Produce Bags come with our Eco-bundle too, so be sure to post a photo of you helping your environment on our page by 5pm today to WIN our Eco-bundle!

Best of luck!

Day 13 of the 14 Day Cattai Challenge – Reduce Your Purchasing Habits

Day 13 of the 14 Day Cattai Challenge – Reduce Your Purchasing Habits

Today’s Eco Tip is about reducing our purchasing habits.

Clothing is a great example of an item that we purchase regularly, and it has been getting more regular as fast-fashion becomes more prone in our society. 

The production of clothing uses a lot of our natural resources such as land and water.

‘In fact, it takes on average 10,000 litres of water to cultivate just one kilogram of raw cotton Read more…

Day 12 of the 14 Day Cattai Challenge – Recycling your Soft Plastics

Day 12 of the 14 Day Cattai Challenge – Recycling your Soft Plastics

The Eco tip of the day is Recycling your Soft Plastics!♻️

Collect your soft plastics and return them to Coles or Woolworths, where they will be a bin waiting for your waste to be recycled!

Having ONE Bin in the household was the norm, where all our waste went straight to landfill. Nowadays there are other ways we can dispose of our waste more thoughtfully. 😁

Soft plastics include:
– Shopping bags including ‘green’ bags
– Fresh Fruit and Veggie bags and wrappers
– Bread bags
– Cereal box liners
– Biscuit wrappers and confectionary packaging
– Rice and pasta packets
– Frozen food bags

Day 12 of the 14 Day Cattai Challenge! The Eco tip of the day is Recycling your Soft Plastics!♻️ Collect your soft plastics and return them to Coles or Woolworths, where they will be a bin waiting for your waste to be recycled! Having ONE Bin in the household was the norm, where all our waste went straight to landfill. Nowadays there are other ways we can dispose of our waste more thoughtfully. 😁Soft plastics include: – Shopping bags including ‘green’ bags- Fresh Fruit and Veggie bags and wrappers- Bread bags- Cereal box liners- Biscuit wrappers and confectionary packaging- Rice and pasta packets – Frozen food bags

Posted by Cattai Hills Environment Network CHEN on Sunday, 19 April 2020

Day 11 of the 14 Day Cattai Challenge – Support an Organisation

Day 11 of the 14 Day Cattai Challenge – Support an Organisation

Today’s tip is all about supporting an organisation that is making fundamental change to Australia’s bush land.

I am donating to Bush Heritage Australia

“They buy and manage land for conservation and partner with Aboriginal groups and other land owners (such as farmers), to help them plan and achieve conservation goals on their land too”

Day 11 of the 14 Day Cattai Challenge!

Day 11 of the 14 Day Cattai Challenge!Today’s tip is all about supporting an organisation that is making fundamental change to Australia’s bush land! I am donating to Bush Heritage Australia!“They buy and manage land for conservation and partner with Aboriginal groups and other land owners (such as farmers), to help them plan and achieve conservation goals on their land too”Link to website: https://www.bushheritage.org.au/what-we-doIf there is an organisation that you have heard of and you love the work they are doing for the environment, help them out by donating, sharing their work on social media or even find out about volunteering opportunities!It’s a great way to help our local environment from home during isolation.If there is an organisation you love, please share it with us on our page! That can be your way of entering the Cattai Challenge as you help your local environment by spreading the good work of these organisations. 🌳😊

Posted by Cattai Hills Environment Network CHEN on Saturday, 18 April 2020

Link to website: https://www.bushheritage.org.au/what-we-do. You can also find them on Facebook and learn about the properties and species they encounter day to day on their Instagram @bushheritageaus.

If there is an organisation that you have heard of and you love the work they are doing for the environment, help them out by donating, sharing their work on social media or even find out about volunteering opportunities.

It’s a great way to help our local environment from home during isolation.

If there is an organisation you love, please share it with us on our page! That can be your way of entering the Cattai Challenge as you help your local environment by spreading the good work of these organisations. 

Day 9 of the 14 Day Cattai Challenge – Join a Bush care group

Day 9 of the 14 Day Cattai Challenge – Join a Bush care group

Today’s Eco- tip is to join your local Bush Care Group!

Day 9 of the 14 Day Cattai Challenge!

Day 9 of the 14 Day Cattai Challenge! Today’s Eco- tip is to join your local Bush Care Group!CHEN is offering the chance to be a part of a Bush Care Group at the Fred Caterson Reserve 😁This Bush Care group will involve bush regeneration activities along with other social activities such as:🌳 BBQ’s🌳 Bush Walks with detective trails 🌳 Yoga in Nature🌳 Tree planting🌳 Painting🌳 Bird Spotting🌳 Frog ID🌳 Tea leaf making The possibilities are endless! We hope to meet monthly. Of course during COVID19 we cannot begin meeting up for these bushcare activities just yet but in the mean time we would love to know who would want to be involved once isolation is lifted!If you would like to receive more information about joining a Bush Care group in the near future, please comment below and we will send you some details! If you would like to join another Bush Care group in a different area, click this link to find more existing groups near you!https://www.thehills.nsw.gov.au/Services/Environmental-Management/Bushcare/Join-a-Bushcare-Group

Posted by Cattai Hills Environment Network CHEN on Thursday, 16 April 2020

CHEN is offering the chance to be a part of a Bush Care Group at the Fred Caterson Reserve 😁

This Bush Care group will involve bush regeneration activities along with other social activities such as:

BBQ’s
Bush Walks with detective trails
Yoga in Nature
Tree planting
Painting
Bird Spotting
Frog ID
Tea leaf making

The possibilities are endless! We hope to meet monthly. Of course during COVID19 we cannot begin meeting up for these bushcare activities just yet but in the mean time we would love to know who would want to be involved once isolation is lifted!

If you would like to receive more information about joining a Bush Care group in the near future, please comment below and we will send you some details!

If you would like to join another Bush Care group in a different area, click this link for Hills Bushcare to find more existing groups near you!